Posts Tagged ‘Lady of the Lake block’

Lady of the Lake Table Runner Pattern!

Wednesday, January 13th, 2016

LadyoftheLakeWorkshopYAY!   So many of you have fallen in love with the Lady of the Lake block as much as I have.   This was block #3 in my 2015 On The Road Project.   And now is proving to be a very popular workshop.

While my workshop and posted blogs on this block cover hand piecing, I do carry the papers to make the block English Paper Piecing style.  Lady of the Lake EPP 1 block

You can find all the blog links here on the Lady of the Lake block.

And all the supplies here in my webstore for making the block.  Just type in Lady of the Lake in the search box to see all available.

I always want to provide a simple 3-4 block pattern for everyone using the blocks I introduce in a table runner so if you choose not to commit to a full quilt there is a home for them.   This is my vow to help not contribute to the UFOs in your life.

I have been working on this pattern for a few months now. Life has certainly gotten busy and I apologize for the delay in getting this pattern done and up on the website since I started showing it on facebook back in September I think it was.

But it is here now!

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The borders are completed via foundation piecing and you will find the two patterns (mirror images) on the final page of the PDF.

The most important word of advice I can give is to piece all the A units at one time and then the B units so that you don’t inadvertently confuse the two when using second fabric in the B5 section.  See my notes on fabric usage on page two of the pattern.

So I hope to see some Facebook posts of Lady of the Lake Table Runners soon!   Don’t forget to “like” my new Facebook page “Piece and Hexiness with MDQuilts”.  This is an open group page so you can easily share all your quilting projects and questions to each other.  Every project is welcome!   Think of it as a quilt guild meeting online!

Enjoy your day,

MickeySignature

 

Lady of the Lake – How to Part #2

Tuesday, May 5th, 2015

WARNING THIS BLOG IS VERY PICTURE HEAVY FOR THOSE DOWNLOADING ON A MOBILE DEVICE

Ok let’s tackle the rest of the block today.  Here is the breakdown of the block again in sections.  We tackled the B-A-Br (r meaning reverse) section last blog, and you will need 4 of those units for this block.

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Now let’s tackle the center  C-E-F-E-C section.  There is just one of these and since there are only single seam sewing there are no roundabouts to do.  The hardest part of this section are the slight curves in the seams joining E & F but you tackled those in the first sections so I am sure you are a pro by now.

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The next section is the D-C-D-E section.  Two units to sew.  Everything thing gets sewn to E.  Start on either D, continue to C and finish with D.

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Remember the trick to nice tight intersections and sharp points is the “roundabout move”.  This has been covered at length in previous blocks (Castle Wall, Paris Flight) so I won’t go back over it here, you can easily refer back to the blogs for a refresher.  But quickly a roundabout is all about passing your needle thru TWO pieces of fabric at a time and making a continuous stitch thru an intersection pulling all the intersecting fabrics together.  An example of this sequence if you started with the right side D piece in the image below, the roundabout would be finish with a backstitch at the end of D/E.  Pass thru D/C, then C/E, back to D/E and finish with D/C again.  Make a back stich and continue sewing C to E.

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All units done.

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Now let’s join the two D-E-C-D units to the center unit of C-E-F-E-C.

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Because this entire length of seam is a curve you must pin.   I pin vertically at each end, at each intersection and then twice, splitting the length, in each D section.   Don’t forget your roundabouts at those two center intersections.

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Now on to the sewing the four corner units.  Yes you can sew these in one big circle around the block.  But that’s a lot of thread to load into your needle.  Too much thread to have a successful and zen sewing time.  So I have decided to just sew each seam individually as I would if I was at my sewing machine.
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Pin your ends and intersections.  Since there is no curve you shouldn’t need to pin your lengths in the B/Br edges.  But if you feel you need to then by all means do.

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The red circles indicate the roundabouts.

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Two more corner units to go!

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And now when joining these units note that there will be NEW roundabouts as indicated by the green circles at the beginning and end of the block.  While some might think these are overkill I feel that in the long run they will make for crisper block when sewing rows together.   And what the heck it’s not like you aren’t a pro at these now to…so sew the roundabouts I say!

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Ta-Da!  Your Lady of the Lake block is done!

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So as mentioned before, all my blocks will have red fabric in the area (piece D) indicated as a way of pulling my scrappy row by row quilt together.

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and I have started kitting the remainder of my blocks for the next two months of travel.

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Join me tomorrow for some inspiration quilt settings with the Lady of the Lake , Paris Flight, and Jim Dandy blocks!

On the homefront I will be shoving off to my guild visit with the Gems of the Prairie in Peoria, IL tomorrow morning.   This being said any orders that come in for templates by midnight tonight I will get them in the mail before I shove off…if not orders won’t go out until Monday, May 11th.

Off to finish packing!

MickeySignature

 

Lady of the Lake Block – How to Part #1

Sunday, May 3rd, 2015

WARNING THIS BLOG IS VERY PICTURE HEAVY FOR THOSE DOWNLOADING ON A MOBILE DEVICE

Let’s begin!  As I said previously this block really has intriqued me.  Don’t let the slightly curved seams scare you.  Hand piecing makes that a breeze and the design elements that they give are awesome.

I am not going to go over marking your fabrics using the acrylic templates as that has been covered already under the general info blogs at the beginning of the year and a very detailed blog here (yes it is for the Castle Wall block but the same info applies to all blocks).

Here are the templates.  There are six shapes in the Lady of the Lake Block.

Fabrics chosen for the block.  Remember what is tying together all my block in my 2015 On The Road Project is the use of red in each and every one.

I am not going to go over marking your fabrics using the acrylic templates as that has been covered already under the general info blogs at the beginning of the year and a very detailed blog here (yes it is for the Castle Wall block but the same info applies to all blocks).  But I will do a few quick pics to help refresh/guide an newcomers…and we have many!

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Ok it’s time to sew!.

Here is an orientation guideline for the templates.  NOTE: Piece B is used flipped over (in reverse) for half the pieces in the block.

You can find a PDF of this orientation guide on the 2015. O.T.R page under the Lady of the Lake Block.

Be sure to keep checking this page periodically for useful/information PDFs.

Let’s break down this block into sections.  There are three.

Br-A-B (4 units)

D-E-D-C (2 units)

C-E-F-E-C (1 unit)

Let’s start with the Br-A-B section.  There isn’t any continuous line sewing in this unit so it will be quick seams.  But there are slight curves, so let’s tackle how to make those happen.

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The pinning for these curved pieces is a bit different than what we have done before in the Castle Wall, Paris Flight and Jim Dandy blocks.   The templates have the corners knocked off on the points so that lining things up will be easier.   You want to line up each corner edge of B to the corresponding edge of A.

MAKE SURE YOU HAVE THE CORRECT B or Br PIECE. 

In fact I suggest laying out your pieces in front of you orientating them correctly before you pick them up to sew.

I pin in a vertical manner as shown  in the seam allowance using an ultra fine pins on each edge.  Then I gently ease in the curve of each piece to each other and put a third pin vertically directly thru the center.   You may wish to check that your seam lines line up with a quick needle check before you begin sewing.  But if you take care marking and cutting your pieces you will find that a little extra time/care in doing so makes life sweeter when sewing.

Now you can begin to sew

IMPORTANT!   Sew two or three threads above your drawn line!

This compensates for the fact that getting into the exact edge of the template with your marking pen/pencil is

nearly impossible.   TRUST ME this is how you end up with a 10.5″ block (unfinished) and not a 10.25″ or smaller block at the end.

Make a backstitch to start off.

And backstitch every inch as you are sewing and always finish a line with a backstitch even if you are going on to another piece without knotting off.

Running stitch.    Remove pin when you reach it with your needle and thread.

Sew to the end of the seam, back stitch and knot off.

Now in order for the curved seam to lay flat we need to make some cuts into the seam allowance.

Three small cuts will do it. Be sure to leave several threads between the end of you snip and the sewn seam.

Viola!  a lovely flat gently curved seam!  SEW EASY to accomplish with hand piecing!

Now continue on with the other side (Br) and then finish up the remaining three Br-A-B units.

Tomorrow we tackle the rest of the block.

’til then,

MickeySignature