2015 On The Road Paris Flight – Hand Piecing the block

WARNING THIS BLOG IS VERY PICTURE HEAVY FOR THOSE DOWNLOADING ON A MOBILE DEVICE

It all starts with the block palette.  Remember treat each block as it's own little quilt and play! Stretch your wings and try a new combo of colors to you.  And keep an eye on your textures.

It all starts with the block palette. Remember treat each block as it’s own little quilt and play! Stretch your wings and try a new combo of colors to you. And keep an eye on your textures.

Work this block in quadrants.

Work this block in quadrants.

And each quardrant is split into two halves.

And each quardrant is split into two halves.

These are the templates.  I have left the brown paper on them for this picture so they are easily seen.  The three circled templates will be used in reverse also in this block.

These are the templates. I have left the brown paper on them for this picture so they are easily seen. The three circled templates will be used in reverse also in this block.

 

THIS IS A VERY IMPORTANT TIP!

This triangle can make or break you in this design.  You will need 8 of it, 4 right side and 4 reverse.  The tip I have for you is to mark the outside edge of the template for orientation.   This is like marking the outside edge of your papers for EPP.   I use this ruler tape.  But you can mark it with anything...even a permanent marker.  Just mark it!

This triangle can make or break you in this design. You will need 8 of it, 4 right side and 4 reverse. The tip I have for you is to mark the outside edge of the template for orientation. This is like marking the outside edge of your papers for EPP. I use this ruler tape. But you can mark it with anything…even a permanent marker. Just mark it!

Here it is marked.

Here it is marked.

 

Pretend this paper is your fabric.  After you trace the template, draw a "X" or two...or three in the seam allowance to indicate that this is the outside edge.  Trust me this will be a great help when sewing together!

Pretend this paper is your fabric. After you trace the template, draw a “X” or two…or three in the seam allowance to indicate that this is the outside edge. Trust me this will be a great help when sewing together!

 

For information on marking pens and tips on marking (freezer paper stabilization) please see my blog post linked here

So now go trace your templates on your fabrics and cut out your pieces.

 

Here is my block ready to be sewn.  I lay out every block just to make sure I haven't reversed, or forgotten to reverse, anything.  And to make sure that I like my fabric choices.  Things can look differently when the fabric is cut to the scale of the block vs. the "blob" you pulled when putting together your palette.

Here is my block ready to be sewn. I lay out every block just to make sure I haven’t reversed, or forgotten to reverse, anything. And to make sure that I like my fabric choices. Things can look differently when the fabric is cut to the scale of the block vs. the “blob” you pulled when putting together your palette.

Here is our quadrant now marked with piece #'s for easy reference and outside edges on those tricky triangles.

Here is our quadrant now marked with piece #’s for easy reference and outside edges on those tricky triangles.

The arrows show the sewing sequence.  Start with #1 and work to #5 on the upper triangle.  And start at #8 and work to #6 on the lower triangle.  Have you needle loaded with enough thread to sew all the seams.    Now let's tackle the next tip.  The intersections as shown with the red circles.

The arrows show the sewing sequence. Start with #1 and work to #5 on the upper triangle. And start at #8 and work to #6 on the lower triangle. Have you needle loaded with enough thread to sew all the seams.
Now let’s tackle the next tip. The intersections as shown with the red circles.

As detailed as I am being in this post I know that for some this may not register at first.  It’s ok.  We are only human.   Don’t give up.

I am putting a link here for the piecing post I did for the Castle Wall Block back in September.

Since that block is a little less complicated,if the following steps cause you panic, go back and read this blog and then jump back here and reread… sometimes seeing the same thing done two different ways/sequences makes things clearer.

Onward we go!

I am going to tackle the 3-piece half of the quadrant first.  I line up piece #7 on piece #8.  I pin on the line.  Always make sure you drawn inner lines match up by pinning.  Do not count on the accuracy of your cut outer edges.

I am going to tackle the 3-piece half of the quadrant first. I line up piece #7 on piece #8. I pin on the line. Always make sure you drawn inner lines match up by pinning. Do not count on the accuracy of your cut outer edges.
NOTE : I am using glass head pins here so that they can be seen. I still prefer Karen Kay Buckley’s new super fine pins that you see in the Castle Wall blog. I will be adding these pins to the web store next week.

And let's sew.  I sew SLIGHTLY ABOVE MY DRAWN LINE.  This compensates for the actual girth of the drawing of the line.   These templates have a 1/4" seam vs a 3/8" seam.  This makes them usable for hand piecing AND for fussy cutting for EPP.  So remember to sew ABOVE the drawn to compensate.

And let’s sew. I sew SLIGHTLY ABOVE MY DRAWN LINE. This compensates for the actual girth of the drawing of the line. These templates have a 1/4″ seam vs a 3/8″ seam. This makes them usable for hand piecing AND for fussy cutting for EPP. So remember to sew ABOVE the drawn to compensate.
Backstich at your beginning. Make a small running stitch. I backstitch every inch on the pieces in this block and always finish with a backstitch before I join the next piece. Here we go….ready to CIRCLE AN INTESECTION?

 

And now you are at your first intersection.  An intersection is where three or more pieces meet.

The trick in hand sewing to accomplishing nice neat intersections resulting in sharp points and no pin holes is making a circle around each and every on when you reach it.

If you have roundabout traffic stops, or have ever encountered on, it’s like that.  You literally go around in a circle.

At this intersection we are joining Pieces #8-7-6 shown in the diagram above.

OK. somewhere I lost a picture so this direction is just going to be written.

Stab Stitch thru Piece #8 to #7.  Pull your thread thru.

Now pin Piece #6 to the opposite side of #6, right sides together (see next pic).

Stab Stitch thru Piece #8 to #7.  Pull thread thru.

With Piece #6 pinned to #7 stab stitch thru the very point of the drawn line. Pull your thread thru.

Here is the backside of this previous picture showing the stab stitch coming right thru the drawn point.

Here is the backside of this previous picture showing the stab stitch coming right thru the drawn point.

 

  Your needle should now be between Piece #6 and Piece #8.  Continue stab stitching thru TWO pieces of fabric at a time…ie, now go thru 6-8, then 8-7, and finally 7-6 where you will start to sew your second seam along the pins shown in the picture above.

Don’t forget to back stitch and finish off with a knot.

Here is your first sewn triangle.  I will tackle pressing tips once the next triangle is complete.

Here is your first sewn triangle. I will tackle pressing tips once the next triangle is complete.

Now we will tackle Pieces 1-5.   Refer to the graphic above with the green arrow for your sewing sequence.

This is my first seam between Piece #1 & #2

This is my first seam between Piece #1 & #2

from the right side

from the right side stabbing needle thru to prepare for the addition of Piece #3

Blog1.0705

Piece #3 pinned in place. I switched to the Karen Kay Buckley pins. And you see I have stabbed thru the point with the needle. My next stitch will be a stab thru #3 to #1, and then #1 thru #2 (again), and finally #2 to #3 exactly where we are in this picture. Doing this may seem tedious but the results are wonderful. Sharp points and no pin holes in your intersections!

Sew your seam!

I've sew piece #3 to #2 and now ready to sew #4 to #3.  When I can I do stack my entire block in order of sewing (see background).  This makes for mindless sewing late at night.

I’ve sew piece #3 to #2 and now ready to sew #4 to #3. When I can I do stack my entire block in order of sewing (see background). This makes for mindless sewing late at night.

Keep sewing until all intersections have been circled and all five pieces of this triangle are together.

Next up ….PRESSING MATTERS!

With this block I have found that pressing the units (ie. triangles) really makes a difference when sewing them together to make the quadrant square.

My tip: PRESS the center triangles seams out on both pieces!  You make think this contradicts the traditional one in and the other out for nestling of seams but with and sewing you have control over those seams and with circling the intersection it really doesn’t matter like in machine piecing.  Press in in this fashion allowed me to really match up the points.

Center Triangles (Piece #3 & #7) pressed with seam allowances out.

Center Triangles (Piece #3 & #7) pressed with seam allowances out.

Sew these triangles together along the center.  I press this seam towards the Piece #6-7-8 Triangle.     This square should measure 5.5″.  If you are too small, which is common the first time you hand piece sew your seams another thread width or two above the drawn line.   Just as in machine piecing.  Keep measuring and adjusting until you find your “sweet spot”.

Once you have four quadrants sewn then arrange them following the line drawing of the block and sew together two units.  Press these seams in opposite directions for the traditional nestle.  Now joint the these two units together (think large 4 Patch).

DISCLAIMER: That center is going to be ugly.  It’s 8 points coming together.  Take your time circling it, go slow and even do it twice if you feel your block needs it.   You can do it.  The first block is always the hardest…just push thru.

Now I once my final block seam is sewn take a look at that center.  If I like what I see I give the mess in the back a slight trim and then I press that final seam open and the wad in the center into submission.   Best Press is my friend and will be yours to!

Here is my hand pieced Paris Flight Block!

Finished Paris Flight Block.  Your block should measure 10.5".

Finished Paris Flight Block. Your block should measure 10.5″.

 

Whew…I need a nap.  🙂

Can’t wait to see your blocks.  If you have a question please post it in the comments or on the facebook page and I will do my best to answer them in a timely manner.  I have a full day of travel tomorrow and lecture in the evening so it may be a day or two.

For those new to the blog…you can find the templates, papers, and all kinds of other goodies in the store on my website.  Just look for the tab at the top that says “Store” and click thru.  You can also find links to my facebook and pinterest pages in the column on the left.   Normally I would put links here but WordPress is starting to act up on this blog post.  I think it needs a nap too.

Enjoy your day,
MickeySignature

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tags: , ,

9 Responses to “2015 On The Road Paris Flight – Hand Piecing the block”

  1. Barbara B says:

    Great post with excellent photos for hand piecing. You answered questions people didn’t know they needed to ask. Well done!

  2. Julie in Tucson, Arizona says:

    Could you show us the back of your completed block? Do all the points that come together result in the little circle after finger pressing? Thanks for your help!!

    • Mickey says:

      Julie I am out the door on a trip so snapping a pic of the back of this block is not possible at this time. I will make a point to show the back of the block I will work on On The Road on the facebook page.

      Yes a circle is acheived with finger pressing.

  3. Melody Zimmerman says:

    OK, probably a dumb question. You take the paper off the back of the templates when you receive them? Also, I’m concerned this new block is going to be beyond my talents. I’ve received my templates and EPP pieces. I’m going to do a lot of studying your instructions before I get started. Thanks very much, Melody

  4. Deborah Marshall says:

    Hi Mickey

    Is this a good project for a newbie? I want to try hand piecing this year…. but wondering if just a 4patch would be better… thanks for all you do!!

    • Mickey says:

      Hi Deb,
      I wouldn’t recommend this block for a newbie but there will be a few blocks in this year’s project that will be easier. I have had hundreds of “new to hand piecing” pick up the Castle Wall templates and be successful in piecing it following the blog post instructions (see page on website for links). I suspect a four patch will become boring after the first one.

  5. Kathy says:

    Mickey, How do you prefer we show you our blocks? On the FB page? Email you ? I have one done, not perfect, but hopefully, will get better! Kathy

Leave a Reply