2015 On The Road – Paris Flight EPP Style

WARNING THIS BLOG IS VERY PICTURE HEAVY FOR THOSE DOWNLOADING ON A MOBILE DEVICE

Ok let me answer a question I get asked a lot ….what does EPP stand for?

EPP = English Paper Piecing

Yes I know many of you know this but some don’t.

English Paper Piecing is wrapping fabric around a paper shape, basting it and hand sewing together.

Many people apply the generic term of Paper Piecing to this…I like to stick the word “English” in there to further define it from foundation piecing.   Foundation piecing is when you have a paper pattern and you are sewing fabric to it along sew lines, flipping fabric back and sewing another to create a block or unit of a block.   This is sometimes also referred to paper piecing.  And thus causes new quilters all kinds of rightfully so confusion.

So I will use the term English Paper Piecing or EPP for short.

Now let me say I will most likely be making 80-90% of my blocks via hand piecing (which I will cover in a blog tomorrow).   Hand piecing works best for me in this type of project as I am literally shoving my block into a small bag and into my backpack to work on while on the road.   I have found that even a hexie EPP project gets mangled with bent papers doing this.   And when working on book samples for the Pieced Hexies and Pieced Hexies Deux books on the road I was constantly ironing EPP hexies in my hotel room.   To avoid this snafu I am going to hand piece on the road and occasionally do an EPP block to share while at home…or if it’s a driving gig and I have the ability to pack things with more care.

So on to specifics about the Paris Flight EPP Block.

 

Four shapes of the Paris Flight Block

Four shapes of the Paris Flight Block

These two pieces will be used in the reverse also in the block.

These two pieces will be used in the reverse also in the block.

Lay out all the pieces in the block and mark the edges with hash marks.  Make sure these hash marks are at least 1/2 inch in length so they will be visible after fabric is basted.  I also mark the four quadrants of this block by number.  This helps keep things in order.

Lay out all the pieces in the block and mark the OUTSIDE edges with hash marks. Make sure these hash marks are at least 1/2 inch in length so they will be visible after fabric is basted. I also mark the four quadrants of this block by number. This helps keep things in order. MARKING THE OUTSIDE EDGE IS VERY IMPORTANT. THIS WILL BE A MAJOR HELP WHEN SEWING PIECES TOGETHER.

Lay them out on the fabric with enough space between to mark a 1/4 inch around each piece.

Lay them out on the fabric with enough space between to mark a 1/4 inch around each piece.  NOTE: I used a dot of glue stick, specifically sewing blue glue stick, to hold papers in place.  Just a dot.

I use several different marking pens and even a mechanical pencil to mark my cutting lines.  Match the best pen/pencil to the job for each fabric.   NOTE: you can use the Paris Flight acrylic templates to mark you fabrics for cutting and side step this process if you wish.

I use several different marking pens and even a mechanical pencil to mark my cutting lines. Match the best pen/pencil to the job for each fabric. NOTE: you can use the Paris Flight acrylic templates to mark you fabrics for cutting and side step this process if you wish.

 

Using a ruler I mark a 1/4 seam around the entire piece.

Using a ruler I mark a 1/4 seam around the entire piece.

To "knock off" excess fabric and make basting a bit easier I measure 1/4" flat from the paper point tip.

To “knock off” excess fabric and make basting a bit easier I measure 1/4″ flat from the paper point tip.

Here is the tip with the excess knocked off.

Here is the tip with the excess knocked off.

 

All ready to be cut out.

All ready to be cut out.

NOTE: if you are using a fabric with a directional print take the time to lay out your papers to use that print to your advantage.   This fabric has a nontraditional stripe print.  By laying out all the papers to flow with the strip it will be less chaotic on the eyes when the block is put together.  These "little things" can make or break a block.

NOTE: if you are using a fabric with a directional print take the time to lay out your papers to use that print to your advantage. This fabric has a nontraditional stripe print. By laying out all the papers to flow with the stripe it will be less chaotic on the eyes when the block is put together. These “little things” can make or break a block.

 

All pieces cut and laid out.  I do this with every block just to make sure I like what I have chosen.  Easier to trade out a fabric now then later when sewn together.

All pieces cut and laid out. I do this with every block just to make sure I like what I have chosen. Easier to trade out a fabric now then later when sewn together.

Basting done.  I won't cover basting here as it is covered in a tutorial on the paperpieces.com website.   Just remember to keep those point flags flying on these shapes!

Basting done. I won’t cover basting here as it is covered in a tutorial on the paperpieces.com website. Just remember to keep those point flags flying on these shapes!

 

Time to sew the four quadrants of the block  together.

Time to sew the four quadrants of the block together.

I sew the two halves of the square together.  And then the longer seam down the center matching up the intersections.

I sew the two halves of the square together. And then the longer seam down the center matching up the intersections.

All four quadrants are sewing together. Next step are to sew the squares together like a four patch.   But wait.....

All four quadrants are sewn together. Next step is to sew the squares together like a four patch. But wait…..

Look what happens if you twist the squares!  A whole new block!  Let's call this London Flight.   So here is another variation you might choose to use in your row quilt.  This project is going to be full of variations so truly it will become a very unique quilt of your own.

Look what happens if you twist the squares! A whole new block! Let’s call this block London Flight. So here is another variation you might choose to use in your row quilt. This project is going to be full of variations so truly it will become a very unique quilt of your own.

Paris Flight Block.   Now off to sew six more together for this row.  Four will have a red in the outside center triangle (see yesterday's blog for graphic) and three will have the red in the inside triangle.

Paris Flight Block.
Now off to sew six more together for this row. Four will have a red in the outside center triangle (see yesterday’s blog for graphic) and three will have the red in the inside center triangle.

Whew..that was a lot of pics.  But I didn’t cover EPP with the Castle Wall block so wanted to do so in detail with Paris Flight.   Tomorrow I will cover hand sewing a Paris Flight block.

I am busy kitting up five more blocks for on the road sewing as my 2015 work calendar begins on Thursday.

Beach Cities Quilt Guild in southern California here I come!

But first a Winter Storm Watch has just been issued for here at home.  Six inches of lovely snow.   I’m off to get these blocks kitted so I can sit and watch the snow fall later today.  I love it.

Enjoy your day,

MickeySignature

 

 

 

 

 

Tags: , ,

3 Responses to “2015 On The Road – Paris Flight EPP Style”

  1. Candy says:

    Thank you for sharing this! Have a safe and fun trip!

  2. Deb says:

    can I ask for your On the road Quilt blocks are you sharing the pattern? and templates? if you are where do I down load it? This would be my first EPP I love to sew in my chair in the eve. your blocks a beautiful

    • Mickey says:

      Hi Deb,
      Please look back at the week of blogs regarding the 2015 On The Road project for all the answers to your questions. I will be adding a 2015 On The Road page to my website with links to all the needed info shortly.

Leave a Reply